Biology

Sewanee: The University of the South

Biology Courses

BIOL 100 Biology and Human Affairs

A general course that studies the biological nature of people and their role in the biosphere. This course has a laboratory component and may count toward fulfilling the college's laboratory science requirement. It cannot be taken for credit if the student has already received credit for Biology 105. (Credit, full course.) Staff

BIOL 105 Biology and People

An exploration of the biological nature of people and their role in the biosphere that includes such topics as anatomy; physiology; and the genetic, nutritional, infectious, and environmental aspects of diseases. This course may count toward fulfilling the college's requirement for a non-laboratory science course. It cannot be taken for credit if the student has already received credit for Biology 100. (Credit, full course.) Staff

BIOL 107 People and the Environment

An exploration of how human activities such as food and energy production, resource extraction and waste disposal affect our natural environment and other organisms living in it. Students learn about how the earth works, how we are stressing the earth's life support systems, and how to deal with the environmental challenges humans face. Specific topics include biodiversity loss and conservation, agriculture and biotechnology, toxicology and environmental health, air and water pollution, and climate change. Non-laboratory course. (Credit, full course.) McGrath

BIOL 109 Food and Hunger: Contemplation and Action

A study of food and hunger from a biological perspective. The interactions among scientific, ethical, and cultural aspects of hunger are also examined. The readings, lectures, and discussions in the course are supplemented with work with local aid organizations and exploration of the contemplative practices that motivate and sustain many of those who work with the hungry. This course cannot be used in fulfillment of any general distribution requirement. (Credit, full course.) Haskell

BIOL 113 Great Ideas in Science

An historical and philosophical approach to selected scientific ideas that have had a profound impact on the development of Western civilization. Emphasis is on the evidence supporting the ideas and controversies that arose during their introduction into our general store of knowledge. Class discussion is encouraged. Non-laboratory course. (Credit, full course.) Palisano

BIOL 114 An Introduction to Botany

Phylogenetic survey of the plant kingdom and a study of flowering plant structures and functions with emphasis on the role plants play in human life. Non-laboratory course. (Credit, full course.) Jones, Evans

BIOL 115 Conservation Biology

A study of the natural processes that control patterns of biological diversity in evolutionary and ecological time and a comprehensive examination of how human activity has resulted in the loss of biodiversity both regionally and globally. Non-laboratory course. (Credit, full course.) Evans

BIOL 118 Current Issues in Biology

This course focuses on timely and controversial topics presented in popular media. Topics vary with each offering but range from those having to do with human health and well-being to those having to do with survival and the future. This course cannot be taken for credit by students who have already completed Biol 100, 105, or any biology course numbered 130 or higher and cannot be counted in the biology major. (Credit, full course.) Jones

BIOL 119 The Human Mind: Artistic and Scientific Creativity

The course examines brain anatomy and physiology, investigates the contributions of artificial intelligence and neural networking in understanding brain function, and explores an interdisciplinary approach to understanding human creativity. This course cannot be used in fulfillment of any general distribution requirement. (Credit, full course.) Palisano

BIOL 125 History and Philosophy of Medicine (also Phil 200)

This course discusses medicine as it has developed from its religious and shamanistic origins to the gradual accretion of diagnostic methods and treatments derived from application of the scientific method. Along the way, it inevitably addresses epistemological issues such as how doctors — and patients and society — know that what they do works, and how their judgments are modulated by the placebo effect and cognitive biases. The course surveys matters such as the history of medical traditions (including osteopathy, homeopathy, chiropractic and allopathy), why allopathy has recently gained ascendancy, and criticism of alternative forms of medicine. This non-laboratory course is offered Easter semester 2011 only and cannot be used to fulfill a general distribution requirement. (Credit, full course.) Desbiens

BIOL 130 Field Investigations in Biology

A study of ecology, evolution and biological diversity, with an emphasis on scientific investigations in the natural areas in and around the University. The course, which is scheduled for one afternoon each week, meets the distribution requirement for a natural science course but does not fulfill the requirement for a laboratory science course. (Credit, full course.) Zigler, McGrath, Cecala, Edwards

BIOL 133 Introductory Cell and Molecular Biology

This course is an introductory study of the molecular and cellular basis of life, of the structure and function of cells, and of molecular genetics. Biol 130 is not a prerequisite. Non-laboratory course. (Credit, full course.) Berner, Summers, Kikis, Moore

BIOL 144 Directed Research

Supervised field or laboratory investigation in biology. This course may be taken more than once for credit and is open only to freshmen and sophomores. It is given only on a pass/fail basis, and, therefore, cannot count in fulfillment of requirements for any major or minor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor (Credit, half or full course.) Staff

BIOL 200 Entomology

A study of insects and related arthropods, with special emphasis on the role of insects in forest and freshwater ecosystems. Lecture topics also include environmental, physiological, medical, veterinary, and agricultural entomology. Life history, ecology, and behavior are studied through field trips. Functional morphology and taxonomy are studied through laboratory exercises, including the use of scanning electron microscopy. Non-laboratory course. Prerequisite: Biology 130 or 131. (Credit, full course.) Zigler

BIOL 201 Ornithology

A comprehensive examination of avian biology. Lectures include student presentations on readings from the scientific literature. Laboratory emphasizes field methods used to study wild birds. A field research project is required. Laboratory course. Prerequisite: Biology 130 or 131. (Credit, full course.) Haskell

BIOL 202 Invertebrate Zoology

A survey of the invertebrate phyla with an emphasis on natural history, functional morphology, embryology, ecology, and phylogenetic relationships. This course has a laboratory component, which requires experimental and field observation, a semester project, and a field trip to a marine laboratory. Laboratory course. Prerequisites: Biology 131 or 132 or permission of instructor. (Credit, full course.) Zigler

BIOL 203 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

This course is a study of the anatomy of the Craniata, including the Hagfishes, and Vertebrates (jawless and jawed fishes, and the tetrapods). It emphasizes the evolution of homologous structures, and relates structure to function where applicable. This course also relates structures to adaptations for life in aquatic and terrestrial environments, and puts these changes into an evolutionary perspective. Laboratory course — studio laboratory. Prerequisites: Biology 130 or 131 or 132 or permission of the instructor. (Credit, full course.) Berner, Moore

BIOL 206 Plant Ecology

A study of plants and their interaction with the environment, with other plants, and with animals emphasizes how plant populations change in size and spatial distribution, how they respond to herbivores and pollinators, and the ecological and evolutionary consequences of plant traits. Laboratories focus on methods for analyzing population and community dynamics. Laboratory course. Prerequisite: one course in biology or permission of instructor. (Credit, full course.) Evans

BIOL 207 Biology of Lower Plants

A survey of the taxonomy, morphology, ecology, physiology, and economic importance of fungi, algae, bryophytes, and certain early vascular plant forms. Laboratory course. Prerequisite: one college course in biology. (Credit, full course.) Jones

BIOL 208 Neurobiology

A comprehensive study of the vertebrate nervous system covering its overall organization and development, function, control of homeostatic systems, and mechanisms of sensory perception. Non-laboratory course. Prerequisite: one semester of biology or psychology, or permission of the instructor. (Credit, full course.) Berner

BIOL 209 Advanced Conservation Biology

A study of the scientific basis for conservation of biological diversity. A case-study approach is used to address problems relating to species decline, habitat loss, and ecosystem degradation at local, regional, and global scales. Course emphasizes population modeling and GIS applications. Non-laboratory course. Prerequisite: Biology 130 or 131. (Credit, full course.)

BIOL 210 Ecology

A survey of the principles and applications of ecological science. Lecture covers the ecology of individuals, populations, communities, and ecosystems. Lab emphasizes field experimentation in the local environment. Prerequisites: Biology 130. A laboratory course. (Credit, full course.) Evans, McGrath

BIOL 211 Biodiversity: Pattern and Process

A study of the diversity of life forms. The course examines major events in the evolution of life, the shape of the evolutionary tree of life, and the processes that underlie the origins of biological diversity. Laboratory, field, and statistical methods of biodiversity analysis are emphasized. Laboratory course. Prerequisite: Biol 130. (Credit, full course.) Zigler

BIOL 212 Entemology

A study of insects and related arthropods, with special emphasis on the role of insects in natural and human-altered systems. Lecture topics also include environmental, physiological, medical, veterinary, and agricultural aspects of entomology. Life history, ecology, and behavior are studied through field trips and student projects. Functional morphology and taxonomy are examined through laboratory exercises and by assembling an insect collection. Laboratory course. Not open for credit for students who have completed Biol 200. Prerequisite: Biol 130. (Credit, full course.) Staff

BIOL 213 Evolutionary Biology

A study of the evolutionary changes that have taken place in biological populations and the mechanisms that underlie these changes. Emphasis is placed on the integration of data with evolutionary ideas and theory, and the application of evolutionary thought to other areas of biology. Non-lab course. Prerequisite: Biol 130 or 131. (Credit, full course.) Haskell

BIOL 214 Bioterrorism

This introductory course examines the biology of microorganisms as agents of bioterrorism beginning with a historical perspective from ancient Greece to the present time. Among topics covered are the pathophysiology and epidemiology of selected microorganisms, genetic modification of these microorganisms, and the role of information mining (literature-based discovery) and bioinformatics in the war on bioterrorism. Topics include the use of microorganisms to contaminate the food, water, or air and measures protecting these resources. Non-lab course. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. (Credit, full course.) Palisano

BIOL 215 Fungi

A survey of the characteristics, classification, economic, and biological importance of these organisms together with lichens and slime molds. This course counts as a non-laboratory half-course, but includes some field and laboratory work. This half course may be used in combination with Biol 216 to constitute a full course in partial fulfillment of the general distribution requirement in natural science. (Credit, half course.) Jones

BIOL 216 Algae and Bryophytes

A survey of these groups of organisms emphasizes their distinguishing features, evolutionary trends, and economic and biological importance. This course counts as a non-laboratory half-course, but includes some field and laboratory work. This half course may be used in combination with Biol 215 to constitute a full course in partial fulfillment of the general distribution requirement in natural science. (Credit, half course.) Jones

BIOL 221 Environmental Physiology of Plants

A study of how plant interaction with surrounding physical, chemical and biological environments influences plant growth, reproduction, and geographic distribution. The course focuses on basic principles of energy and carbon balance, water and nutrient relations, and interactions with other organisms. Students examine evolutionary hypotheses related to plant traits, as well as the ecological ramifications of these traits in different environments. Adaptations in plant physiological ecology in response to environmental stress and human alterations of global-scale processes are also discussed. Laboratories focus on instrumentation and field methods for quantifying plant responses to environmental factors under natural and stressful conditions. Prerequisite: Biol 130 or 131. (Credit, full course.) McGrath

BIOL 222 Advanced Conservation Biology

An examination of the negative impact of human activity on biological diversity and an exploration of how conservation science can be used to ameliorate that impact. Case studies are used to investigate such issues as deforestation, exotic species invasions, habitat fragmentation, endangered species protection, natural area management, and habitat restoration. Students examine critically the role of science in public policy decision-making as it relates to the protection of biodiversity in the United States. The course involves student-led discussions, guest speakers, field trips, and independent research. Laboratory exercises explore the use of field techniques, GIS analysis, and population modeling as problem-solving tools in conservation biology. Not open for credit to students who have completed Biol 209. Laboratory course. Prerequisite: Biol 130 or 131. (Credit, full course.) Evans

BIOL 232 Human Health and the Environment

This course integrates concepts in ecology and public health through the study of environmental threats to human health. Topics include population growth and food security, toxicity and toxins, food borne illness, emerging disease, waste and wastewater, air pollution, climate change, and assessing human risk. Students explore the interaction of poverty, environmental degradation, and disease during a one-week field trip over spring break to a developing country and/or by conducting research projects examining local environmental health issues. Laboratory course. Prerequisite: Biol 130 or 131. (Credit, full course.) McGrath

BIOL 233 Intermediate Cell and Molecular Biology

An extension of topics introduced in Biol 133, this course is a study of the molecular and cellular basis of life, of the structure and function of cells, and of molecular genetics at an intermediate level. Prerequisites: Biol 133 and one semester of college chemistry or permission of instructor. This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed Biol 321. Laboratory course. (Credit, full course.) Berner, Summers, Kikis, Edwards

BIOL 235 Freshwater Conservation

A survey of existing and emerging threats to wetland ecosystems and the consequences for animal and human populations. This course discusses causes, consequences, and solutions for issues of international and local concern based on an understanding of freshwater ecology and function. Also considers multiple perspectives on water use and attempts to reconcile these differences so as to identify and publicize potential conservation solutions. Prerequisite: Biol 130 or Fors 121. (Credit, full course.) Cecala

BIOL 237 Freshwater Biology

A study of the biology of freshwater ecosystems. Students examine interactions between freshwater species and their aquatic environments, as well as among one another, in the context of physical and chemical limitations associated with freshwater habitats. Laboratory emphasizes common techniques for inquiry, and a field research project is required. Laboratory course. Prerequisite: Biol 130. (Credit, full course.) Cecala

BIOL 241 Rainforests and Coral Reefs

This course provides a fundamental understanding of the ecology and natural history of coral reef and tropical rainforest systems using Belize as a case study. Students examine specific environmental problems associated with these systems. Designed to be a companion and prerequisite to Biol 251. Not open for credit to students who have completed Biol 151. (Credit, half course.) Evans

BIOL 250 Molecular Evolution

An examination of the evolution of nuclear, viral, and organellar genomes and of protein structure and function. Topics covered include the origin of life, the evolution of globin and other families of proteins encoded by nuclear genes, mitochondrial and chloroplast DNA, and molecular phylogenetic analysis. Use of computer algorithms for analyzing both nucleic acid and protein sequences are introduced in the classroom. Prerequisites: permission of instructor. Non-laboratory course. (Credit, full course.) Staff

BIOL 251 Field Study in Belize

A field immersion into two of the most biologically diverse ecosystems on earth: coral reefs and tropical rainforests. Students live in remote field stations in Belize, where they examine the ecology and natural history of these two systems through extensive field exploration and research. Prerequisite: Biol 241. The Belize Program (Biol 241 + Biol 251) counts as one full lab course in Biology. Evans (Credit, half course.) Evans

BIOL 255 Herpetology

A comprehensive examination of the diversity, ecology, and evolution of amphibians and reptiles. Students examine the systematics, biogeography, morphology, physiology, behavior, ecology, and conservation of amphibians and reptiles. Laboratory emphasizes survey and monitoring techniques. A field research project is required. Prerequisite: Biol 130 (Credit, full course.) Cecala

BIOL 260 Cave Biology

An examination of the biology of caves and other subterranean habitats. The course focuses on the structure and function of cave ecosystems and the evolutionary biology of cave animals. It also involves field trips to caves in the area. Prerequisite: Biol 210 or Biol 211. (Credit, full course.) Zigler

BIOL 280 Molecular Genetics

Designed for students interested in molecular mechanisms by which cellular processes are controlled in eukaryotic cells. Topics include introduction to molecular genetic techniques and genomics, in-depth study of structures and chromosomes, transcriptional control of gene expression, signal transduction pathways relating to gene regulation, and abnormal regulatory processes that lead to disease. Prerequisites: Biol 132, or Biol 133 and 233. Laboratory course. (Credit, full course.) Summers

BIOL 288 Biotechnology

This course provides an overview of technologies and methodologies used by biochemical engineers. It addresses topics such as how to manipulate DNA to produce genetically modified organisms, how to design viral based delivery systems for gene therapy, how to design a drug that targets a specific cell molecule, and how to determine protein interaction networks. Prerequisite: Biol 233. A student cannot receive credit for this course and also for Biol 289. (Credit, full course.) Summers

BIOL 289 Biotechnology (with laboratory)

This course provides an overview of technologies and methodologies used by biochemical engineers. It addresses topics such as how to manipulate DNA to produce genetically modified organisms, how to design viral based delivery systems for gene therapy, how to design a drug that targets a specific cell molecule, and how to determine protein interaction networks. Prerequisite: Biol 233. A student cannot receive credit for this course and also for Biol 288. (Credit, full course.) Summers

BIOL 300 Biology of Aging

A study of the molecular and physiological processes that govern our longevity. This course integrates seminar and laboratory formats, using model organisms to examine the impact upon aging of dietary restriction, drugs that might induce longevity, genetics, and reproduction. Full use is made of relevant primary literature. Prerequisite: Biol 233 or instructor’s permission. (Credit, full course.) Staff

BIOL 301 Genetics

A study of fundamental principles of heredity including molecular aspects and evolutionary implications of these concepts. Non-laboratory course. Prerequisites: two 300-level biology courses and Chem 120. (Credit, full course.) Jones

BIOL 302 Plant Growth and Development

A study of growth and developmental processes in plants, especially as they are influenced by environmental factors and by hormones or plant growth substances. Prerequisites: one college course in biology and Chem 120, or permission of instructor. (Credit, half course.) Jones

BIOL 305 Plant Physiology

The principal functions of higher plants, including photosynthesis, gas exchange, water and solute relations and transport, mineral nutrition, plant hormone action, and environmental responses. Prerequisites: one college course in biology and Chem 120, or permission of instructor. (Credit, full course.) Jones

BIOL 306 Biochemistry

A one semester survey of biochemistry. The following topics are addressed: biochemical primary literature and internet resources, bioenergetics, acid-base balance, protein structure and function, enzyme function and kinetics, metabolism, topics in physiological biochemistry, and topics in molecular biology. Non-laboratory course. Prerequisite: Chem 201 and Biol 132, or permission of instructor. (Credit, full course.) Staff

BIOL 307 Mechanistic Biochemistry (also Chemistry 307)

An examination of all aspects of protein science, including protein biosynthesis, protein structure, and the mechanisms of enzyme catalysis, with particular emphasis on the detailed chemical mechanisms of enzyme catalysis. Prerequisite: Chem 202. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three and one-half hours. (Credit, full course.) Summers

BIOL 308 Genetically Modified Organisms

A study of methods and techniques used to produce plants, animals, and microbes with recombinant or modified DNA. Students also examine issues that are directly related to DNA manipulation, including gene selection and cloning, intellectual property rights, GMO product development, food safety and security, federal government regulation, ecological impacts, ethical and religious concerns, media treatment, and consumer perception. Non-laboratory course. Prerequisite: Biol 132. (Credit, full course.) Staff

BIOL 310 Plant Evolution and Systematics

A comprehensive survey of trends in vascular plant diversity and the evolutionary mechanisms underlying these trends. Laboratory course. Prerequisites: one course in biology or permission of instructor. (Credit, full course.) Evans

BIOL 312 General and Human Physiology

This course covers general physiological concepts such as homeostasis, control theory, and system analysis. It also takes a detailed view of how these general principles apply specifically to various physiological systems in humans and other mammals in some cases. Systems such as respiration, circulation, digestion, metabolism, thermoregulation, and excretion are studied at cellular, tissue and whole system levels. In cases where form is especially critical to function, anatomy is also covered, although there is no human dissection. Not open for credit to students who have completed Biol 314. Prerequisite: Biol 132, and Chem 102 or 111, or permission of instructor. (Credit, full course.) Berner

BIOL 313 Ecosystems and Global Change

A study of how the cycling of elements among the atmosphere, soil, water and living organisms sustains ecosystems, and how disruptions in these cycles, both natural and human-induced, bring about environmental change. The course examines environmental consequences of alterations in regional and global biogeochemical cycles, such as loss of ecosystem productivity and diversity, degradation of air and water quality, and global climate change. Field labs allow students to evaluate the sustainability of land use locally by quantifying elemental cycles in natural and human-altered ecosystems. Laboratory course. This course cannot be taken for credit by a student who has already received credit for Biol 312. Prerequisites: one course in Chemistry and one course in Biology; Forestry may be substituted for Biology with instructor permission. (Credit, full course.) McGrath

BIOL 314 General and Human Physiology

This course covers general physiological concepts such as homeostasis, control theory, and system analysis. It also takes a detailed view of how these general principles apply specifically to the various physiological systems in humans and, in some cases, to other mammals. Systems such as respiration, circulation, digestion, metabolism, thermoregulation, and excretion are studied at cellular, tissue, and whole system levels. In cases where form is especially critical to function, anatomy is also covered although there is no human dissection. Laboratory course. Not open for credit to students who have completed Biol 312. Prerequisites: Biol 233 or permission of instructor. (Credit, full course.) Berner

BIOL 315 Advanced Ecology and Biodiversity

A study of advanced topics in ecology and biodiversity, with an emphasis on integrating study of the scientific literature with field research in the natural areas of the Cumberland Plateau. Prerequisite: Biol 210 or Biol 211. Writing intensive. Laboratory course. (Credit, full course.) Haskell

BIOL 316 Biochemistry of Metabolism and Molecular Biology (also Chem 316)

A study of the biochemical reactions of eukaryotic cellular metabolism and bioenergetics, focusing on enzyme regulation and function, protein structure, nucleic acid structure and function, and selected topics in molecular biology and physiological biochemistry. Prior coursework in cell/molecular biology is recommended. Laboratory course. Prerequisites: Biol 233 and Chem 202. (Credit, full course.) Staff

BIOL 318 Molecular Revolutions in Medicine

A survey of major molecular mechanisms of human disease, including approaches to diagnosing, preventing, treating, and curing disease conditions. This course features an overview of basic human genetics, an introduction to pharmacological methodologies in drug design and the FDA approval process and a survey of current technologies associated with gene therapy and stem cell treatments. Prerequisite: Biol 233. Not open for credit to students who have completed Biol 219. (Credit, full course.) Summers

BIOL 319 Cancer Cell Biology

This course is an overview of cancer development at the cellular and molecular levels. It uses a survey of primary scientific literature to cover the basic cell biology of cancer. Topics include growth control, angiogenesis, invasion, metabolism and cell signaling as they relate to the progress of cancer. Laboratory course. Not open for credit to students who have completed Biol 320. Prerequisite: Biol 233. (Credit, full course.)

BIOL 320 Cancer Cell Biology

This course is an overview of cancer development at the cellular and molecular levels. It uses a survey of primary scientific literature to cover the basic cell biology of cancer. Topics include growth control, angiogenesis, invasion, metabolism and cell signaling as they relate to the progress of cancer. Non-laboratory course. Not open for credit to students who have completed Biol 319. Prerequisite: Biol 233. (Credit, full course.)

BIOL 321 Cell Biology

An extension of topics introduced in Biol 132 relevant to the structure, function, and organization of eukaryotic cells. Modern cellular and molecular biology techniques are applied in the laboratory to establish the tools of the cell biologist and understand aspects of yeast and mammalian cell function. Laboratory course. Prerequisites: Biol 132, and Chem 102 or 111, or permission of instructor. (Credit, full course.) Kikis

BIOL 325 Biology of Aging

A study of the molecular and physiological processes that govern our longevity. Seminar course focused on a careful examination of the primary literature. Demonstrations using living animals illustrate the effects of dietary restriction, potential longevity-inducing drugs, genetics, and reproduction on aging. No laboratory. Prerequisite: Biol 233. (Credit, full course.) Kikis

BIOL 328 Molecular Revolutions in Medicine

A survey of major molecular mechanisms of human disease, which includes approaches to diagnose, prevent, treat, and cure disease conditions. This course covers an overview of basic human genetics, an introduction to pharmacological methodologies in drug design and FDA approved process, and an overview of current technologies involving gene therapy and stem cells. Laboratory class. Not open for credit to students who have completed Biol 318. Prerequisite: Biol 233 or permission of the instructor. (Credit, full course.) Summers

BIOL 330 Immunology

An introduction to the vertebrate immune system with emphasis on molecular and cellular events. Topics include organization of the immune system, structure and function of immunoglobulins, genetics of immunoglobulin diversity, clonal selection theory, complement-mediated processes, the major histocompatibility complex, cell-mediated responses, immunization, innate immunity, autoimmunity, and immunodeficiency. Laboratory course. Prerequisites: Biol 132 or permission of instructor. (Credit, full course.) Palisano

BIOL 331 Immunology

An introduction to the vertebrate immune system with emphasis on molecular and cellular events. Topics include organization of the immune systems, structure and function of immunoglobulins, genetics of immunoglobulin diversity, clonal selection theory, complement-mediated processes, the major histocompatibility complex, cell-mediated responses, immunization, innate immunity, autoimmunity, and immunodeficiency. Non-laboratory course. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. (Credit, full course.) Palisano

BIOL 333 Developmental Biology

A study of animal development with an emphasis on gametogenesis, morphogenesis, and differentiation of the primary germ layers and their derivatives, as well as developmental mechanisms at cellular and subcellular levels. Laboratory course. Not open for credit to students who have completed Biol 334. Prerequisite: Biol 130, or permission of instructor. (Credit, full course.) Zigler

BIOL 336 Endocrinology

Study of the signaling mechanisms by which cells in a multicellular organism communicate the nature of the signals, and the molecular processes that give rise to and respond to these signals. Topics addressed include principles of hormonal communication, mechanisms of hormone action, control of endocrine activity, environmental and nutritional effects, reproduction, and neuroendocrinology. Primary focus is on human signaling molecules and how hormone dysregulation can cause disease. Prerequisite: Biol 233. This course is offered Easter Semester of 2014 only. (Credit, full course.)

BIOL 339 Studio Course in Microbiology

A survey of the structure and functions of bacteria and viruses with an emphasis on the characterization and classification, cultivation, reproduction and growth, chemical and physical control of growth, microbial metabolism, and microorganisms and disease. Other topics include microbiology of foods, soil, and wastewater. Short laboratory exercises on selected topics, such as gram staining, food microbiology, and water analysis, are conducted at the end of the appropriate lectures. The course does not count as a laboratory science course. A student cannot receive credit for this course and also for Biol 340. Prerequisites: Chem 102 or 111, or permission of instructor. (Credit, full course.) Palisano

BIOL 340 Microbiology

This survey of the structure and functions of bacteria/viruses and introduction to immunology emphasizes the characterization and classification, cultivation, reproduction and growth, chemical and physical control of growth, microbial metabolism, and microorganisms and disease. Other topics of discussion include microbiology of foods, soil, and wastewater. Laboratory course. Prerequisites: Chem 102 or 111, or permission of instructor. (Credit, full course.) Palisano

BIOL 350 Environmental Physiology and Biochemistry of Animals

An examination of the interaction between an animal’s environment and the animal’s physiology and biochemistry. Of special interest is how environmental change causes short-term adaptation and long-term evolutionary change in physiological and biochemical traits. The types of such changes that take place, and the evolutionary mechanisms responsible for them, are studied through comparison of animals found in various moderate and extreme environments. Laboratory course. Prerequisites: Biol 233 or permission of instructor. (Credit, full course.) Berner

BIOL 380 Genomics

This course provides an introduction to the field of genomics. It aims to help students understand how genome-scale information (DNA sequences, genome variations, microarrays, and proteomics) can provide a systems biology perspective. Topics addressed include the structure of the human genome, strategies used to map and sequence the genome, and detailed examination of how genomic sequence information can be used in both laboratory and clinical settings. This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed Biol 381. Prerequisites: Biol 132, or Biol 133 and 233. Non-laboratory course. (Credit, full course.) Summers

BIOL 381 Genomics

This course provides an introduction to the field of genomics. It aims to help students understand how genome-scale information (DNA sequences, genome variations, microarrays, and proteomics) can provide a systems biology perspective. Topics addressed include the structure of the human genome, strategies used to map and sequence the genome, and detailed examination of how genomic sequence information can be used in both laboratory and clinical settings. The laboratory component offers students hands-on experience in running and analyzing their own DNA microarray. This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed Biol 380. Prerequisites: Biol 132, or Biol 133 and 233. Laboratory course. (Credit, full course.) Summers

BIOL 388 Epigenetics

This course explores the field of epigenetics in a discussion-based format, using both primary and secondary scientific literature. Topics focus on cellular differentiation and pathologies derived from the misregulation of epigenetic systems in the cell, including imprinting during development and mutations involving DNA methylation of CpG islands during cancer progression. Prerequisites: Biol 233. A student cannot receive credit for this course and also for Biol 389. (Credit, full course.) Summers

BIOL 389 Epigenetics (with laboratory)

This course explores the field of epigenetics in a discussion-based format, using both primary and secondary scientific literature. Topics focus on cellular differentiation and pathologies derived from the misregulation of epigenetic systems in the cell, including imprinting during development and mutations involving DNA methylation of CpG islands during cancer progression. Prerequisites: Biol 233 and one course from Biol 318, Biol 320, Biol 333, and Biol 380. A student cannot receive credit for this course and also for Biol 388. (Credit, full course.) Summers

BIOL 401 Biology Tutorial

Supervised study projects involving a topical survey of existing texts and/or periodical literature. May be taken more than once for credit. (Credit, half course.) Staff

BIOL 444 Independent Study

Supervised field or laboratory investigation. May be taken more than once for credit. (Credit, half or full course.) Staff

Sewanee: The University of the South